Aftershokz and Our Ultimate Running Playlist

SIX REASONS TO LOVE AFTERSHOKZ

From our tech-savvy gear tester, Lyle Haywood, of Fleet Feet Sports Murfreesboro, TN.

1) Bone Conduction. Earbuds easily fall out, feel uncomfortable or, after a while, even irritate the inner ear. And for people with hearing aids, they’re simply not an option. Aftershokz make it easy. They work by sending small vibrations through your cheekbones into your ears which, leads us to number two. …

2) Safety. Since they rest outside your ears, you’re able to hear music and still be aware of your surroundings—important for running!

3) Sound quality. You’ll be surprised how much bass you can hear without something inside your ear. And the range of sound is phenomenal—you’ll rarely have to turn the volume up or down from song to song.

4) They don’t move. Aftershokz won’t move at all for the duration of your workout. Plus, they feel surprisingly light and comfortable. Oh, and they’re sweat resistant.

5) Six hours of battery life. The battery lasts for about six hours of constant play. And, if not in use, the battery won’t drain even if they're left on.  

6) Built-in microphone. We love that you can go from listening to music on a run or at the gym to a business call. With just a click of a button (by your left ear), you can quickly answer, hang up, and then resume listening to music again.

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Our Ultimate Running Playlist

1 - Shake it Out by Florence and the Machine. Full of anticipation and adrenaline. Reserve this track for later in a workout or race to keep you going strong. Definitely repeat worthy.

2 - 1957 by Milo Greene – Sweeping melodies and pining voices illicit an emotional wave that may result in daydreaming and long run distraction. In short: those final few miles will go by in no time!

3 - Shut Up and Dance by WALK THE MOON – It’s got a motivating beat and infectious tune. We love it so much we could listen to on repeat at the end of a hard run if we needed to. Plus, the line “… don’t you dare look back” is perfect for pushing past the proverbial wall.

4 - What Do I Do by SJUR – The way this song transitions from chorus to bridge to verse is perfect for fartlecks.  

5 - Under Pressure by Queen – It’s a classic. Everything about this track is amazing. Enough said.  

6 - Another One Bites the Dust by Queen – We recommend listening to this song multiple times throughout your run. It’s direct, forceful, and creates motivation for passing competitors on the course.  

7 - Wake Up by The Arcade Fire – It’s fierce and uplifting with a stomp beat and full choir to urge you onward. Perfect for a busy mind on an early-morning long run.  

8 - Something Good Can Work by Two Door Cinema Club – It’s light, airy, catchy, playful, and good for looping if you need some sound consistency.

9 - Closer by The Chainsmokers – This song is, unfortunately, so catchy it’s hard to get it out of your head. If hearing the same boring lyrics over and over doesn’t bother you, the basic, almost trance-inducing beat of this song will keep your stride consistent.

10 - Eye of the Tiger by Survivor – Obligatory add.

11 - As We Ran by The National Parks – OK, we picked this tune mostly because the lyrics: “dreaming as we ran, we used the stars in the sky as our map.” The mention of tree-line and the Tetons entices us with the promise of exploration and adventure. Plus, the band name is The National Parks, and we need to preserve them. A good reminder.

12 - Little Lion Man by Mumford and Sons – It’s upbeat and folky with aggressive, wide-open lyrics that hit you in the face. Good for getting after it.

13 - Run by Delta Rae  - OK, we chose this because she belts “I wanna run” in every chorus. What else do you need?

14 - Raise Your Glass by Pink – This playlist just wouldn’t be complete without Pink’s empowering voice. And this track is a Pink classic; it’s upbeat and celebratory. Hear this song and imagine crossing the finish line in a new PR. Bam.


What is your favorite running song? We want to know. Send us an email and share your tunes. ashley.arnold@fleetfeet.com 


What about cadence? Should we select music based on some optimal number of steps per minute? Click here to learn more